What’s Next?

Welcome to DBRL Next, the library’s blog for adults! Here you’ll discover authors, programs, area events and learning resources. Visit often and find your next good book. Unravel the mysteries of new technologies. Read about upcoming films, lectures and computer classes. Participate in Adult Summer Reading. Find a volunteering opportunity, a new hobby and more. What’s next? Scroll down to find out!

Libraries Change Lives

Book cover for This Book Is Overdue by Marilyn JohnsonThis week we’re commemorating National Library Week.  Many of us have a story about the role of libraries in our lives. Here is mine.

“Two books per visit per week,” said the unsmiling librarian as she handed me a library card. Neither the limits nor her demeanor surprised me, a 9-year-old Jewish girl growing up in Moscow in the 1950s — a city where everything was strictly regulated and rationed. I read the two books in two days and impatiently waited for the next visit.

I needed those visits. The books were filled with stories in which, no matter how grim things seemed, everything came out well in the end, rewarding honesty, bravery and wisdom — a striking contrast to my everyday experiences. I needed the security of the bookish world, with no worries about the future and no anti-Semitism, which followed me even to my library where, recorded below my age and address, appeared the label: Jewish.”

Thirty years later, a recent immigrant to the U.S. with a 13-year-old daughter, I stood in front of another librarian. This librarian was smiling.

“What did she say?” I asked my daughter, who already knew a little English and often served as my interpreter.

“She said, ‘Can I help you?’ ”
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Vote for the 2014 One Read Book!

logo-web1April elections aren’t just about school boards and city councils. Each year the Daniel Boone Regional Library asks area readers to help choose that year’s One Read book. One Read is a community-wide reading program that invites adults in Mid-Missouri to read the same book over the summer and then attend programs based on that book during the month of September.

Between now and May 2, cast your vote for either “Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk” by Ben Fountain or “The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics” by Daniel Brown.

Learn more about these titles and cast your vote at oneread.org!

Resources for Green Thumbs at Your Library

Book cover for Plantiful by Kristin GreenIt happens every year. The daytime temperatures start to creep above 50 or 60 degrees, and I’m suddenly overspending at the local garden center, filling my cart with a ridiculous number of pansies, their cheerful, bright faces turned towards the sun. I don’t have a green thumb. Half of what I plant each year dies from neglect, mismanagement or simple bad luck, but I still can’t keep myself from digging hopefully in the dirt each spring.

For gardeners and gardener wannabes, the library has plenty of books, programs and online resources for inspiration and education.

For ideas in your inbox, sign up for our monthly home and garden newsletter. Each month you’ll receive a list of 10 recently published titles, and the list always includes some new gardening books like “The Know Maintenance Perennial Garden” by Roy Diblik and “Plantiful” by Kristin Green.
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Bookmarks: What’s Saving Your Page?

Bookmarks are thought to have been used since at least the end of the medieval period, but one of the first references to their use involves the presentation of a silk bookmark to Queen Elizabeth I of England (circa 1584). People use all sorts of different things as bookmarks, everything from old receipts to love letters. Lauren, one of our librarians at the Columbia Public Library, said she attended a conference where four or five librarians admitted to having found bacon in a book! How do you save your place in a book? Let us know in the comments! (And please don’t put bacon in our books.)

I have been using leftover paint chips from a project as bookmarks. This color is “Radiant Orchid.” Currently reading: “The Creative Habit” by Twyla Tharp.

1 Katie

Rob is using his car title at the moment. Currently reading: “The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick.” (Editor’s note: This was a patron’s personal book. Using important documents as bookmarks in library books is not a good idea.)

Photo of a book and bookmark

This adorable handmade creature marks Angela’s page. Currently reading: “Every Day” by David Levithan.

Photo of a book and bookmark


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Classics for Everyone: Emily Dickinson

Book cover for Collected Poems of Emily DickinsonIf Emily Dickinson never came out of her room, how does everyone know about her? The answer lies in the 1,775 poems the recluse in white left behind when she died in 1886. Only a few were published during her lifetime. But thanks to the efforts of her sister, Lavinia, the world came to know Emily and her verse posthumously.

From around the age of 30 on, Dickinson limited the physical range of her world to the confines of her Amherst, Massachusetts home and a wardrobe of white dresses. But she kept a connection to society through prolific correspondence with a number of people. Many of her letters included poems; more than 100 went to the editor of the Atlantic Monthly. But editors of the day were not ready for the ways in which her poems broke with convention.

Though she lived a largely intellectual life, her poetry shows richness, depth and a grounding in concrete realities. She wrote of death heralded not with trumpets but the buzzing of a fly. She describes a snake as “the narrow fellow in the grass” and the feeling you get when you see him as “zero at the bone.” Even hope took on a physical manifestation for her: “Hope is the thing with feathers…”
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Exploring the Missouri Immigrant Experience Through Photography and Film

photo of Latino immigrants, from the Missouri Valley Special Collections, Kansas City Public LibraryMissouri’s history is rich with the contributions of immigrants from Germany, Ireland, Italy, Poland, and elsewhere. Today, as a destination for refugees and new groups of immigrants, Missouri has become home to people from Bosnia, Bhutan, Vietnam, Iraq, Somalia, Mexico and other countries, contributing to and shaping Missouri’s economy, neighborhoods and families.

Explore the Missouri immigrant experience with these programs at the Columbia Public Library.

Faces and Places Photo Exhibit
April 5 – 25
Columbia Public Library

View an exhibit of photos about the Missouri immigrant experience on the first and second floor clay brick walls. The exhibit features historical images from archival collections and a selection of photos by contemporary photographers of immigrant communities in Missouri. The exhibit is sponsored by Missouri Immigrant & Refugee Advocates with support from the Missouri Arts Council, the Missouri History Museum, the Missouri Humanities Council, the Puffin Foundation, the State Historical Society, the Regional Arts Commission of St. Louis, the City of Columbia Human Rights Commission and Welcoming Missouri.

The exhibit features contemporary works by:
Juan Montaña
Amela Sinanagic
Oscar Pedroza
Rita Chu
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