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Welcome to DBRL Next, the library’s blog for adults! Here you’ll discover authors, programs, area events and learning resources. Visit often and find your next good book. Unravel the mysteries of new technologies. Read about upcoming films, lectures and computer classes. Participate in Adult Summer Reading. Find a volunteering opportunity, a new hobby and more. What’s next? Scroll down to find out!

Staff Review: The Night Sister

Book cover for The Night Sister by Jennifer McMahonYou know those writers whose work is so captivating that you’d read their grocery lists? Jennifer McMahon is definitely one of those writers for me. As one half of a pair of sisters, I’m also sucker for a book where sisters play a prominent role, so it’s likely “The Night Sister” would’ve ended up on my bedside table one way or another. If you enjoy mysteries that feature multiple timelines, numerous points of view and the setting of a deliciously creepy house (or in this case, hotel-as-castle), then this book might be for you as well.

“The Night Sister” begins in the present with sisters Piper and Margot receiving the shocking news that childhood friend Amy has brutally slain almost her entire family and herself, with only her daughter escaping. Then the novel turns back half a century to the childhood of Amy’s mother and aunt. Rose and Sylvie live in the Tower Motel, built like a castle complete with tower. Sylvie dreams of escaping to Hollywood and becoming an actress, while Rose is caught up in the stories their grandmother told them of mares, shape-shifting monsters hidden inside regular-seeming people.

The bridge between these two story lines is the summer of 1989, where Piper and Amy test their fledgling adolescence against the backdrop of the disused Tower Motel. Despite little-sister Margot tagging along behind Piper and future-police-officer Jason keeping watch over his crush Amy, the two enjoy sufficient freedom to learn enough about themselves — and the mysteries of the Tower Hotel — to change their friendship forever. But can Piper’s knowledge of the past help her piece together what really happened in the recent tragedy?
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Latino Americans: 500 Years of History

Flora Sanchez 1Beginning later this month, the Daniel Boone Regional Library will honor the contributions of Latino Americans through story, song, dance and film. As a Mexican-American, I look forward to inviting our community to join in this region-wide celebration.

The roots of my family were planted in this country nearly a century ago and have been cultivated with much love, or as my Grandma Flora would say, “con mucho cariño.” In 1917, my grandmother immigrated to the United States as a toddler with her parents and older sister, Ruth. The Mexican Revolution had swept through their birthplace of Zacatecas and my great grandparents were seeking safety and security for their young family.

My great grandfather, Jose Moreno, and his brother Ezequiel eventually brought their families to East Los Angeles where they set up a Mexican bakery called “La Esperanza.” By 1926, they had 25 employees and a fleet of delivery trucks to distribute their pan dulce (sweet bread) and tortillas all over the city.
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Race in America

Book cover for Just Mercy by Bryan StevensonThe library recently added a copy of “The Ferguson Report” to the collection, and it is very much worth reading. The report covers an in-depth investigation into both the police department and the judicial system in Ferguson, Missouri where black teenager Michael Brown was killed by a white police officer. The report shows a systemic and “implicit bias” in these institutions. For those who have had to live as the targets of this system, this is not news and not isolated to this one municipality. The report is very critical, but it also offers specific recommendations, such as a publicly accessible database to track use of force.

For a broader understanding of race in America, pick up one of these excellent, recently published books.

Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption” by Bryan Stevenson

“Each of us is more than the worst thing we’ve ever done.”

This book was recently the winner of the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize. Of all the books on our justice system that I have read lately, this is one of the very best. It definitely puts a human face on it, case after heartbreaking case.
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Win a Copy of Jo Ann Trogdon’s Book About William Clark

Book cover for The Unknown Travels and Dubious Pursuits of William ClarkThis September, more than 50 history buffs came to the Columbia Public Library to hear attorney and writer Jo Ann Trogdon talk about her recently published book, “The Unknown Travels and Dubious Pursuits of William Clark,” in which Trogdon reveals Clark’s highly questionable activities during the years before his famous journey west of the Mississippi. Using Clark’s diary and ledger entries, she investigates evidence linking Clark to a series of plots in which corrupt officials sought to line their pockets with Spanish money and to separate Kentucky from the United States.

Win a copy of this imaginative, surprising and vividly written book from your library! One lucky winner will be notified after October 19. (Contest limited to residents of Boone and Callaway Counties. One entry per person, please.)

Enter now!

New Magazines at DBRL

Bee Culture Magazine coverpoets and writers coverThe world of print is rapidly changing.  Many of the large metro daily newspapers are folding – think of the sad case of the Rocky Mountain News, once the beacon of newspaper publishing in the West, which died a slow death in the 1990s and 2000s and finally stopped printing in 2009. To survive, magazines and newspapers are either switching their format to a much reduced publishing schedule or even changing their look and format entirely. A good example of how the newspaper and magazine publishing industry is having to adapt is the example of the Christian Science Monitor. Once a daily newspaper, it is now published in a slick magazine format, just once a week.

The magazine world, however, is still hanging in there and indeed thriving in some respects. Lots of great new titles are now coming out, targeting a “boutique” independent magazine audience or changing their look with shorter articles and smaller format. The Daniel Boone Regional Library currently holds a wide and varied collection of magazines on our shelves at our Columbia, Fulton and Ashland branches.  Some of these magazines are brand new over the last couple of years, and some are actually old titles, published for many years, that we just recently acquired. Many of the magazines featured here were purchased due to patron requests. It must also be noted that several of the titles can be found through our digital magazine service, Zinio.  Let’s take a look at some of the newest and freshest titles that we are now carrying.

Bee Culture

One of the great things about the collection here at the Daniel Boone Regional Library is that we are constantly adapting and listening to patron needs and requests.  A perfect example of this is the magazine Bee Culture, which was requested to be included in our collection this past year.  The September 2015 issue of this magazine includes news items like the Regional Honey Price Report, in addition to articles about bee repellent and New Jersey bee laws. The September issue also includes an in-depth article about beekeeping at a state prison, and how the process of raising these bees helped maintain stability and focus for the inmates.
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Top Ten Books Librarians Love: The October 2015 List

Halloween is around the corner, but the list of books publishing in October that librarians across the country love isn’t scary. Well, unless you fear your to-read pile growing too tall. This month’s LibraryReads list includes novels from big names in literary fiction, like Geraldine Brooks (“March,” “Caleb’s Crossing“), David Mitchell (“Cloud Atlas,” “Bone Clocks“) and Margaret Atwood (“The Handmaid’s Tale,” MaddAddam Trilogy) – perfect for longer nights and cooler days. Enjoy!

Book cover for City of FireCity on Fire” by Garth Risk Hallberg
“WOW! An excellently executed work with intricate plot lines and fascinating characters. It’s a story of how the stories of many different people of New York City in the late seventies crash into each other like waves on rocks. This work may encapsulate the whole of New York City, as it has wealth, love, filth, passion, aimless angst and a myriad of other aspects of humanity swirling in that amazing city.” – Racine Zackula, Wichita Public Library, Wichita, KS

Book cover for After You by Jojo MoyesAfter You” by Jojo Moyes
“I loved ‘Me Before You‘ and thought it ended in the perfect place, but any doubts I had about continuing the story were quickly erased when I started this sequel. Jojo Moyes is a master at tugging on your heartstrings. I laughed, I cried and I nearly threw my Kindle against the wall at one point. Give this to anyone in your life who has experienced a tragic loss. With a box of tissues.” – Joseph Jones, Cuyahoga County Public Library, Cleveland, OH

Book cover for A Banquet of ConsequencesA Banquet of Consequences” by Elizabeth George
“Still reeling from a previous fall from grace, police detective Barbara Havers has a chance to redeem her standing–if she can unravel the very twisted threads that led to the murder of a prominent English feminist. Meanwhile, her superior officer Thomas Lynley pursues a love interest even as he keeps a sharp lookout for any slip-ups by Havers. This is the strongest addition to the series in years.” – Starr Smith, Fairfax County Public Library, Falls Church, VA

Here are the remaining October titles for your holds-placing pleasure!
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