Juvenile Nonfiction: Not Just for Kids

Book cover for The Human Body by Jon RichardsDid you know the human body contains enough carbon to fill 900 pencils? Neither did I until I read “The Human Body,” part of The World in Infographics series.

Blogs and discussion forums abound for grown-ups who read young adult novels. Emboldened by the example of those who are no longer embarrassed to embrace their enjoyment of literature aimed at teens, I now confess my enduring love for juvenile nonfiction, books intended for upper elementary and middle school kids.

Sometimes I’m so interested in a topic I want that 400-page, in-depth volume written for adults.  Other times I’d prefer a quick and simple explanation. I’ve found the kids’ section at the library often provides what I need. I’ve checked out books about crafts, hamster care, astronomy, history and more.

Now I’ve found The World in Infographics series of books, which I read because they caught my eye rather than in a quest for specific information.  They contain all sorts of cool factoids, accompanied by fun graphics. “The Human World” illustrates mandatory paid holidays per country through images of beach chairs. “Planet Earth” has a diagram of tectonic plates that held my interest for quite a while. Also, I hadn’t realized there were so many different kinds of volcanoes.

Maybe you’re curious about what those NASA types are really talking about when they mention quasars or nebulae, but you don’t want to feel like you’re studying for a degree in astrophysics. Or you want a quick brush-up on who Alexander the Great was and how he mattered in history without having to delve into the details of his military strategies. Or you just want to know what to feed your hamster. Speak to your librarian; juvenile non-fiction might be right for you.

About Ida

Ida is a lucky seventh child who loves literature, kakuro puzzles and Doctor Who.
This entry was posted in Live & Learn and tagged , , .

Comments are closed.